Article Index

Here are all our articles sorted A – Z

 

Traditional buildings seem to have lost their time in the spotlight following the popularity of ‘Grand Designs’-style TV shows where contemporary architecture reigns supreme. It is these more humble buildings, however, which make up the majority of the UK housing stock, and their simple nature can take many charming forms.

For those who prefer roof pitches to flat roofs, casement windows to structural glazing, and local building materials as opposed to white render and shards of glass, this selection of homes is sure to inspire.


Quick tip

Paint effects

Try out different paint effects to give your home a new look, try rag rolling, stippling or marbling. If you’re handy with a paint brush and eager to let your inner artist out, then consider painting a trompe l’oeil effect on a wall. Remember you could simply project an image onto a wall and paint around it – you don’t need to be a great artist to have a go at this. So get your paint brushes out and get creative.


 

Built to look like it’s been stood for centuries, this traditional Cotswolds home has been constructed using the local stone to look like an old coach house which has been added to over the years.


Electrical Tip

“Although at first glance lighting, sockets and off-peak heating in France may all appear familiar, closer investigation will reveal that the installation methods are different to those employed in the UK”

Excerpt From: Thomas Malcolm. “Electricity in your French house.” iBooks. https://itunes.apple.com/gb/book/electricity-in-your-french-house/id413215097?mt=11


 

  • Build cost: £500,000
  • Location: Gloucestershire

This traditional home has been constructed using timber frame and clad in Cotswold stone to look like a Georgian farmhouse.

  • Build cost: £316,000
  • Location: Wiltshire

This project in the south of England has been built using traditional methods in a Cape Cod style, complete with dormer windows, low eaves and a wrap-around veranda.

  • Build cost: £273,000
  • Location: East Sussex

Tall chimneys, a steep roof pitch, gables and dormer windows all help to achieve the Arts and Crafts aesthetic in this new traditional-style home built by Snell David Architect.

  • Build cost: £800,000
  • Location: Cambridgeshire

5. An Energy-Efficient Cottage

Constructed in a Conservation Area and an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, this traditional-style cottage has been built to mirror the form and materials typical of this part of the Dales. Thanks to its ultra energy-efficient insulation materials and building techniques, the home just missed Passivhaus certification.

  • Build cost: £180,000
  • Location: County Durham

Built using brick and flint, with nods to both the Georgian and Arts and Crafts movement, this self build oozes character and looks as if it’s been standing for years.

  • Build cost: unknown
  • Location: Wiltshire

This beautiful timber frame holiday home just 200 yards from the lake in the Lake District combines traditional building materials with contemporary aesthetics.

  • Build cost: £565,000 (incl. £35,000 for the garage and £40,000 for landscaping)
  • Location: Lake District

This Georgian-style timber frame self build with symmetrical façade and sash windows came in on a tight budget thanks to taking on elements of the project on a DIY basis.

  • Build cost: £145,000
  • Location: Worcestershire

This cottage in Cambridgeshire has been built to look every bit the period home, complete with a combination of a Norfolk reed thatch roof and dutch herringbone patterned brick.

  • Build cost: £250,000
  • Location: Cambridgeshire

By learning the basics of a few trades, and taking on the role of project manager, the owner of this home in the Cotswolds was able to build his dream home for around half the price of the average detached home in the area.

  • Build cost: £135,000
  • Location: Wiltshire

Anne and Rob Skinner found a prime plot in west Sussex which was occupied by a pre-war bungalow that was ripe for demolition. In its place, they built a traditional-style home where energy efficiency and low maintenance were key criteria of the design.

  • Build cost: £418,000
  • Location: West Sussex

Behind the façade of this traditional, vernacular-style self build is a highly sustainable home, built on a tight budget. Costs were kept low by homeowner Geoffrey and his family undertaking all the decoration, painting the kitchen cabinets, insulating the loft and fitting out the garage.

  • Build cost: £140,000
  • Location: Norfolk

Ingrid and Warren Furlong have built a traditional farmhouse using stone from their own land and reclaimed materials. “People are usually surprised when they discover our house isn’t old,” says Ingrid of the farmhouse.

  • Build cost: £100,000
  • Location: County Wicklow, Ireland

See the original article here https://www.homebuilding.co.uk/traditional-homes-gallery/


DIY Tips

Want to add a personal touch to your home? Then get creative to add style that’s one of a kind to your home. Patchwork, knitting and crochet can all be used to add chic soft furnishings and accessories to your home, from cushions to throws and more. If you are new to crafting there’s lots of advice available online including helpful craft tutorials. Also take a make do and mend approach to upcycling existing pieces in your home with paint, decoupage or fabric.


 

Give is your thoughts by email ….

or join our Forum and discuss your tips or experiences Visit the forum


Off-peak

“If you elect to have off-peak (heures creuses) electricity, then EDF will provide you with wiring controlled by their equipment to switch your off-peak system on and off. The EDF off-peak equipment is usually a relay located beside their meter and fusegear. This relay is meant for the control circuit functions of your contactor (contacteur) or off-peak relay (jour/nuit) only. It must not be used to directly control equipment. The EDF relay is timed to operate in the usual manner at the predetermined off-peak times”

Excerpt From: Thomas Malcolm. “Electricity in your French house.” iBooks. https://itunes.apple.com/gb/book/electricity-in-your-french-house/id413215097?mt=11


 

We are a new website, we are still growing our content, we want everyone that is renovating in France to help us feature what we all wanted to know when we all started, contact us with all your experience and tips, we live just south of Celles Sur Belle, in Deux Servre, 79, and are just about to start out on our next renovation, every job we start on, every problem, product or skill we need to learn about i will try and find some useful information on the internet and share it with you, yes I could do this by sharing it on facebook, but the problem is it just helps facebook and disappears down the timeline, here links and articles will be searchable and here permanently for you to book mark and refer to, so watch this space … and if you have links and articles that have helped you let us know !!1

If you’re looking to build your own home, but don’t have the available time or knowledge in order to project manage your own build, then you might be tempted to go down the package build route.

Package build or kit homes are fully specified at the design stage and often prefabricated off site. This leads to a quick and efficient build process with fewer unexpected surprises, and thus more certainty when setting the budget.


Quick tip

Paint effects

Try out different paint effects to give your home a new look, try rag rolling, stippling or marbling. If you’re handy with a paint brush and eager to let your inner artist out, then consider painting a trompe l’oeil effect on a wall. Remember you could simply project an image onto a wall and paint around it – you don’t need to be a great artist to have a go at this. So get your paint brushes out and get creative.


 

Kit homes are no longer limited to a range of designs chosen from a brochure. Bespoke options are available, while off-the-shelf designs can be altered to ensure they suit your lifestyle needs.


Off-peak

“If you elect to have off-peak (heures creuses) electricity, then EDF will provide you with wiring controlled by their equipment to switch your off-peak system on and off. The EDF off-peak equipment is usually a relay located beside their meter and fusegear. This relay is meant for the control circuit functions of your contactor (contacteur) or off-peak relay (jour/nuit) only. It must not be used to directly control equipment. The EDF relay is timed to operate in the usual manner at the predetermined off-peak times”

Excerpt From: Thomas Malcolm. “Electricity in your French house.” iBooks. https://itunes.apple.com/gb/book/electricity-in-your-french-house/id413215097?mt=11


 

Kerrie Daykin and Emile Borgonha turned to a German package supplier for their eco-friendly chalet-style self build.

The couple had been considering a traditional oak frame property, but instead opted for this contemporary A-frame design, which was constructed by Baufritz to have outstanding green credentials.

The package company positioned the house to make best use of the sunlight. This southern most orientation is complemented by the house’s most striking feature, the overhanging roof. It protects the interiors from overheating in summer through several composite tilt and turn windows, while still allowing the low winter sun to penetrate the open plan interiors.

  • Supplier: Baufritz
  • Build cost: £450,000 (£2,432/m²)
  • Location: West Sussex

This low-energy, contemporary home was built using an innovative dry construction technique with some of the stages taking place offsite. This meant that the house took just six months to construct. The result is a super-insulated and highly energy-efficient home, with flexible living space and light-filled interiors.

  • Supplier: Facit Homes
  • Build cost: £312,000 (£1,560/m²)
  • Location: Hertfordshire

Constructed in just three months, this eco-friendly log house with its North American lodge vibe features internal walls clad in wood.

The prefabrication construction method used ready-cut redwood pines (along with made-to-measure doors, windows and insulation) imported from Latvia.

The speedy build also meets and surpasses eco requirements and costs the homeowners very little to heat and run.

  • Supplier: Log Cabin UK
  • Build cost: £180,000 (£1,059/m²)
  • Location: Derbyshire

Liz and Mike Hauck wanted their new home to be contemporary – unlike the large traditional homes nearby – practical, and easy to maintain as they approached retirement.

They were also looking for a house that wouldn’t be a source of toxins, as Liz suffers from multiple chemical sensitivity, a condition triggered by materials in the built environment.

So they chose German package company Baufritz to construct the home, as the company has a unique building system using natural, healthy materials and a carbon shielded coating designed to minimise electronic radiation.

  • Supplier: Baufritz
  • Build cost: £2,300/m²
  • Location: Surrey

Chrissie and Richard Baker were looking for a contemporary but unfussy design with lots of glass, inside/outside living, an open plan living area and a garage underneath. They also wanted their new home to be low energy.

Rather than using an architect, a quantity surveyor or a project manager, the couple spent many hours planning and designing their dream home on a simple piece of home design software, using magazines and the internet to guide their schemes.

They then turned to Potton, who turned their conceptual drawings into working constructional drawings and planning submissions before designing and erecting the timber kit home.

  • Supplier: Potton
  • Build cost: £398,000 (£1,396/m²)
  • Location: Isle of Man

This timber frame single-storey property was designed to look like two old weatherboarded barns connected by a glazed conservatory link.

Peter and Rita Hutchinson worked with retired architect and friend Clive Plumb to plan their home for their retirement. They then employed a local builder to organise their project, and used a bespoke timber frame kit which was designed and erected by Potton.

The spacious 400m² single storey layout contains only two bedrooms, and has been totally dictated by the couple’s lifestyle and their overriding desire for open spaces and large rooms with high ceilings.

  • Supplier: Potton
  • Build cost: £650,000 (£1,625/m²)
  • Location: Bedfordshire

Paul and Kate Lauder wanted a traditional Kent-style house that would fit in with the local vernacular and look as though it had evolved over the years.

Oakwrights was commissioned to build the oak frame that makes up the main construction element of the house and is largely responsible for the characterful, period look.

The main section of the house has been designed to replicate an old Kent farmhouse. Another section is designed to look like a later addition, with partial timber weatherboarding over brick, and dormer-style windows. A smaller single storey ‘extension’ has been fully weatherboarded and painted in a different colour.

To complete the illusion of a house that has been added to over the centuries, a number of different window and casement styles have been used.

  • Supplier: Oakwrights
  • Build cost: £500,000 (£1,684/m²)
  • Location: Kent

Useful Information

‘Minsters Walk’ was constructed as a bespoke timber frame kit, with an off-the-shelf design  customised for the homeowners’ needs. 

The homeowners, Ellen and John McCann, chose the ‘Borve’ house from Firefly Wood, which is suited to south-facing plots like this one. The layout keeps service zones to the north and living spaces to the south to make the most of the sun and passive solar gain for warmth. The design is open plan and has double-height living spaces to maximise light.

The McCanns decided to dispense with the fourth bedroom, and include a studio and study space instead. They also removed several doors to enhance the open plan arrangement. For the interior, they used oak and ceramic floors with oak detailing in the staircase and kitchen. 

  • Supplier: Firefly Wood
  • Build cost: £225,600 (£1,376/m²)
  • Location: Scottish Borders

When Andy and Alison Nicholls first contemplated building their own home, they were driven by their wish to save energy bills rather than any desire to build a pioneering home.

Nevertheless, the Nicholls are now the proud owners of what is believed to be the UK’s first carbon-positive home.

The home, which uses natural materials and building methods, locks away more CO2 than was emitted during its construction and manufacture — including transporting the entire building from Germany and even running the house for the first few years.

  • Supplier: Baufritz
  • Build cost: £625,000 (£2,050/m²)
  • Location: Cornwall

Homeowners Richard and Rachel Stent replaced their old 1930s home with this contemporary PassivHaus, which was built as a turnkey project by German manufacturer Hanse Haus.

Once planning permission had been granted, the couple undertook two trips to Germany to refine the drawings and specify internal finishes, including flooring and sanitaryware.

Quick build times are common when building a Passivhaus, due to the large amount of factory prefabrication involved. The shell of the house was completed in just two days and four months after work first began on site, the family moved into their new home.

  • Supplier: Hanse Haus
  • Build cost: £400,000 (£1,600/m²)
  • Location: Somerset

This oak frame cottage been constructed using SIPs (structural insulated panels) for a quick build, while maintaining a period style with a traditional porch.

Border Oak was responsible for erecting the oak frame, which has been finished externally with traditional lime render. The timber framed utility room is clad in contrasting weatherboarding, and a traditional picket fence adds the finishing touch.

High-quality building materials, including handmade clay roof tiles, oak doors and windows were selected. Internally, the cottage has been finished in pale pastel shades designed to show off the oak beams and joinery.

  • Supplier: Border Oak
  • Build cost: £200,000 (£909/m²)
  • Location: Cambridgeshire

This four bedroom red brick home combines the charm of a traditional farmhouse with modern technology, such as a sprinkler system and a ground-source heat pump powering the underfloor heating.

Homeowners Simon and Louise Sturdy chose to use a Potton timber frame, as speed was important to them. The couple worked with one of Potton’s in-house designers to develop a bespoke design based on the company’s Rectory range, incorporating fine casement windows and a sweeping feature staircase.

Once the foundations and slab were completed to precise dimensions, the timber frame was delivered and erected by Potton in just two and a half weeks.

  • Supplier: Potton
  • Build cost: £380,000 (£1,105/m²)
  • Location: Salisbury

Homeowners Robin and Miyuki Walden met several package suppliers at a Homebuilding and Renovating Show, including Hanse Haus — the German package company they eventually chose to build their home.

“While Hanse Haus built the home, it was crucial we had our own architect as the planners insisted we respected the local Cotswolds style. Our architect Renato got it spot on. Once he had done the sketches he sent these off to Hanse Haus,” says Robin.

The result is a striking home that takes its cue from the nearby agricultural buildings, using Cor-ten steel cladding.

Energy efficiency was another priority for the couple. The home features a host of renewables features including 16 photovoltaic panels, a borehole and air-source heat pump with underfloor heating. Triple-glazed windows, along with masses of insulation, keep the home airtight.

  • Supplier: Hanse Haus
  • Cost: £746,000 (£1,445/m²)
  • Location: Gloucestershire

See the original article here https://www.homebuilding.co.uk/13-inspiring-kit-homes/


DIY Tips

Want to add a personal touch to your home? Then get creative to add style that’s one of a kind to your home. Patchwork, knitting and crochet can all be used to add chic soft furnishings and accessories to your home, from cushions to throws and more. If you are new to crafting there’s lots of advice available online including helpful craft tutorials. Also take a make do and mend approach to upcycling existing pieces in your home with paint, decoupage or fabric.


 

Give is your thoughts by email ….

or join our Forum and discuss your tips or experiences Visit the forum


Electrical Tip

“Although at first glance lighting, sockets and off-peak heating in France may all appear familiar, closer investigation will reveal that the installation methods are different to those employed in the UK”

Excerpt From: Thomas Malcolm. “Electricity in your French house.” iBooks. https://itunes.apple.com/gb/book/electricity-in-your-french-house/id413215097?mt=11


 

We are a new website, we are still growing our content, we want everyone that is renovating in France to help us feature what we all wanted to know when we all started, contact us with all your experience and tips, we live just south of Celles Sur Belle, in Deux Servre, 79, and are just about to start out on our next renovation, every job we start on, every problem, product or skill we need to learn about i will try and find some useful information on the internet and share it with you, yes I could do this by sharing it on facebook, but the problem is it just helps facebook and disappears down the timeline, here links and articles will be searchable and here permanently for you to book mark and refer to, so watch this space … and if you have links and articles that have helped you let us know !!1

All prices are in dollars as this is a US review …. but all these drills are available in France

 

For me, the cordless hammer drill is arguably one of the most well-used tools in my arsenal. Anyone who uses these tools knows they have tons of torque, and the selectable transmission gears, variable speed motors and various drilling modes make them extremely versatile. In fact, you can drill and/or drive fasteners into nearly any material with these tools. No matter how advanced rotary hammer technology gets or how impressive the new wave of cordless impact drivers may be, cordless hammer drills are still the go-to tool for many builders and contractors. When drilling into wood, they give you a more consistent cut with paddle bits and hole saws, and they won’t stall out as easily as an impact driver will when they run into obstructions.


DIY Tips

Want to add a personal touch to your home? Then get creative to add style that’s one of a kind to your home. Patchwork, knitting and crochet can all be used to add chic soft furnishings and accessories to your home, from cushions to throws and more. If you are new to crafting there’s lots of advice available online including helpful craft tutorials. Also take a make do and mend approach to upcycling existing pieces in your home with paint, decoupage or fabric.


 

Editor’s Note: Check out our 2015 Best Heavy Duty 18V Hammer Drill Buying Guide


Off-peak

“If you elect to have off-peak (heures creuses) electricity, then EDF will provide you with wiring controlled by their equipment to switch your off-peak system on and off. The EDF off-peak equipment is usually a relay located beside their meter and fusegear. This relay is meant for the control circuit functions of your contactor (contacteur) or off-peak relay (jour/nuit) only. It must not be used to directly control equipment. The EDF relay is timed to operate in the usual manner at the predetermined off-peak times”

Excerpt From: Thomas Malcolm. “Electricity in your French house.” iBooks. https://itunes.apple.com/gb/book/electricity-in-your-french-house/id413215097?mt=11


 

The multi-purpose aspect of the hammer drill has got to be its largest appeal. With the multi-geared transmissions, I have been known to set my drill in low gear to mix up a bucket of tile grout or a batch of knock-down drywall finish. Given the rise of concrete construction in the residential market, we are seeing more and more the need to drill a hole or two in concrete to set an anchor. For this type of “occasional” drilling of smaller diameter holes for anchors and other concrete fasteners, the cordless hammer drill is perfect. Because of the tremendous use you can get out of these tools, it’s very likely the hammer drill is going to be around for a long while. Plus, as manufacturers continue to develop and improve on their models to make them smaller, more powerful and versatile, the reasons for wanting to see which ones are the market leaders becomes clear. This round-up is going to take a first hand look at most of the major players in the 18V cordless hammer drill segment.

How a Hammer Drill Works
Hammer drills use a “cam-action” to create their hammering motion. Inside the gear case, there are two sets of toothed gears that mechanically interact with each other. When the motor is rotating, this mechanism causes the chuck assembly and bit to move forward and backward on the rotational axis of the motor. In fact, the hammer action is directly tied to the rotation of the motor. The faster the motor spins, the more “hits” occur. Given the design of the hammer system, these types of drills are normally not used for production (serial) drilling but rather for occasional masonry drilling applications.

 

The 18V Cordless Hammer Drill Round-up Tools

Since this is a test of18V cordless hammer drills, it’s worth pointing out some of the commonalities among all the tools in the lineup. At the time when I requested the tools for this review, the products submitted represented the top offerings from each manufacturer for this category. All the tools were tested as they come in their kit forms, which is to say that I didn’t swap in higher capacity batteries to enhance performance. Each drill kit came with two batteries, a charger, detachable side handle and some kind of carry case or tool bag. If you are a carry case kind of guy, the DeWalt is the most compact and the carry-on sized Makita is the largest. All the drills have switchable, multi-gear transmissions, variable speed motors, torque limiting selection rings and three different drilling/driving modes. All the drills have keyless chucks that are ratcheting, single sleeve models with serrated jaws that bite into the bits to minimize slippage (especially when in hammer mode). The drills that we tested featured three different motor design characteristics—among them, brushless, brushed, frameless and four pole varieties. In my testing I strove to see if any of these motor technologies helped to make a drastic difference in performance and if that could be quantified.

Testing 18V Cordless Hammer Drills

When looking at hammer drills and how to test them, I tried to come up with ways that would simulate how I have used them on past construction projects. For starters, my testing was not designed to see which drill I could cause to smoke first by doing drilling and fastening applications that they weren’t designed to do. Mixing up buckets of thinset or mortar is a good example of what not to do with a cordless drill. (From experience, I can say that you can get a way with this a few times, but eventually you will burn up even the most expensive and powerful drill.) In contrast, I wanted to test using applications and materials that would be encountered by any regular Joe involved in residential or commercial construction.

Test 1 – Concrete Endurance

With freshly charged batteries on each drill and a brand new 3/16” Tapcon brand carbide tipped concrete drill bit in the chuck, I was ready for the first test. The goal of this test was to see how many 2” deep holes (for use with 1/4” x 1-3/4” Tapcon screws) we could drill on a single charge. After every 20 holes we gave each hammer drill a minimum of a 15 minute cool down time to reduce overheating the tools and the batteries. Using 4” x 8” x 16” masonry cap blocks we picked up from Lowe’s, I drew a 1” x 1” grid on each. Three different contractors were used to test each tool to help minimize the differences in user technique and to provide feedback as to how each tool functioned. The winner for this test was the Milwaukee 2604-22 with second place going to the Hilti SFH18-A. The interesting thing to note on both of these tools is that they are the only drills in the test that came with batteries over 3.0 amp-hours. In debriefing, we saw that the number of holes seemed directly related to the watt-hour rating of the batteries. In fact, if these two drills were equipped with lower capacity batteries they would likely have been right in the middle of the pack as far as the number of holes drilled. Given that the Ridgid R8611501 currently comes with a 3.0 amp-hour battery, it did a stellar job for being the only other tool to break 100 holes. Considering many manufacturers (including Ridgid) are in the process of bringing their next-gen 4.0 amp-hour batteries to market, this should present an exciting upgrade for current users of these drills.

Nearly 600 holes were drilled in all, and we had an opportunity for some secondary results that had to do with user comfort. Since we had multiple tradesmen involved in testing these tools, I had a good chance to gain some feedback on the perceived vibration and ergonomics of each. I say “perceived” vibration since I lacked scientific tools to actually measure it. (Such tools exist but were out of the scope of this review.) The tools with the least amount of felt user vibration were the Hilti, Makita and Milwaukee (in that order), making them a real joy to operate. When using these drills, it felt as if the bit was simply melting into the concrete. The drill that just about made all our teeth chatter and our hands fall asleep was the Hitachi. Limiting user fatigue didn’t seem to be a design priority in this drill’s development.

Test 2 – Speed in Concrete

The objective of this test was to show off how fast each hammer drill could make a hole. What this test demonstrates is the tool’s ability to effectively transmit the energy of the drilling and hammering action into the workpiece. Specifically, I measured and averaged how fast our construction professionals could drill a hole in the same concrete cap blocks used in Test 1. With new batteries installed in each drill and a brand new 3/16” Tapcon brand carbide tipped concrete drill bit in each chuck, I had each of my contractors drill four holes. Each hole was drilled to a depth of two inches, and the time to drill each hole was recorded. In total, twelve holes were drilled by each tool and the average time of drilling these holes was taken in order to get the time seen in the chart. Since three different operators were enlisted to test each tool, we also minimized the effects of differences in drilling technique.

dewalt DCD985L2 concrete drilling

Timed Drilling Tests

On serial drilling applications, we’ve found rotary hammers to be the the tool of choice, but that’s not always the tool you have on-hand for less repetitive work. In any case, we wanted to see how quickly each of our seven hammer drills could bore a 3/16″ Tapcon bit two inches into our 4″ cap block.

timed drilling tests

There are three solid ranges of speed that came out of this test, The fastest tools were the Milwaukee, Hilti and the Makita (in that order)—all taking less than five seconds. The second place group included Bosch, DeWalt and Ridgid—each hitting around the mid-five seconds. The slowest tool in the test was the Hitachi which averaged over a second longer than the next closest tool.

Test 3 – Wood Boring

For most of my plumbing and electrical rough-in projects I like to use self feeding bits. While traditional paddle bits are good, self feeding fluted bits are better. Chip removal is improved, and the need to bare down on the tool is almost eliminated since the bit will literally pull its way though the material. The trick with self feed bits is that when they are being fed into the material, you need a drill that can handle the task. For this test I took 1” Irwin Speedbor MAX Speed Bits and sent them through 2×4 spruce studs. All the drills were set to drill mode with the mechanical gear boxes set to the lowest speed which gives more torque. I timed each hole that I did and took the average to come up with the numbers in the table. The fastest drill in this test was the DeWalt, taking just 4.1 seconds to make the hole. Second place went to Milwaukee who came in at 4.4 seconds. Even some of the “slowest” tools, the Ridgid and Hilti, took just 5.5 seconds each (which is really not slow at all).

makita LXPH03 drilling

Test 4 – Hole Saws

Arguably, one of the most strenuous tasks for a cordless drill is using a hole saw. Hole Saws need a lot of torque and power. For this test we used 2” Lenox hole saws and drilled three holes with each drill though a spruce 2×4. The average time was taken for each tool to get the number that is on the chart. The DeWalt was the clear winner in this test, and the Bosch came in a close second. The interesting thing that we noted is that the tools that did really well in the concrete drilling applications did not necessarily fare the same with high-torque drilling tests in wood. If you thought a hammer drill was a hammer drill, be sure to check out our chart near the end of the review. There is a 14.4 second difference between the fastest and slowest drill when tackling a single 2″ hole. That’s a stat that might just change your mind.

milwaukee 2604-20 hole saw

Test 5 – Lag Bolt Install

As a final test to challenge the torque, power and durability of these drills, I decided to drive large size lag screws into laminated board made up of seven layers of 3/4” sub-flooring plywood. Plywood is a great choice since it is not prone to cracking or checking. I chose 1/2″ x 6″ long lag screws as the size to base this test on. I did not do any pre-drilling or pilot holes, and I was not concerned with the number of screws that could be put in. Rather, I was simply looking to see if they could be driven fully home. The idea behind this ambitious test comes from dock and deck building where large size ledger lags are utilized. The only difference is that pre-drilling those holes is preferred and has actually been shown to provide a more secure hold.

The test results reveal that actually none of the tools were able to fully install the 1/2″ x 6″ lag screws. Not being able to fully install the screws is not a failure, but rather a demonstration of just how hard it is to drive these monster size screws. What I experienced with every drill was they they timed out when the load was more than the tool was able to handle. This is a good thing since the electronics kicked in to help protect the motor and battery from the potentially disastrous results of being over stressed. Every tool tested has this excellent feature. When I took my results and changed them into percentages of the screws that were installed, I found that it nearly perfectly corresponded with our initial electronic torque testing results as well as the manufacturer’s specs. My torque testing results vary slightly from the manufacturers’ since there are differences in equipment, fixtures and testing methods. My goal was not to prove or disprove manufacturers’ specifications, but rather to see if I could find a reasonable way to quantify the torque statements given by the manufacturers. I found that the tools with higher torque ratings were indeed able to drive the larger screws further before the tool experienced shut down. Score one for truth in advertising.

specs grid part 2

specs grid part 1

18V Cordless Hammer Drill Round-up Conclusion

Hammer Drills are a great demonstration that certain tools will never go out of style. The ability to drill wood or concrete and drive screws with the same tool makes 18V hammer drills the base tool for almost any decent tool kit on the market. In our round up, I really enjoyed the smooth way that Hilti SFH 18-A melted the drill bit into the concrete and how fast the DeWalt DCD985 sent a hole saw though a wood stud. I did not find substantial differences between the motor technologies other than the Milwaukee, which seemed to run faster and further than the rest. (Of course, some of that can be attributed to its higher capacity battery.) In many of the categories in which I tested the tools, you will see that most of the results are pretty close to each other. What this means is that aside from certain small features and user preferences, many of the tools in this line-up are very similar in terms of their raw performance.

18V Cordless Hammer Drill Round-up Tool By Tool

bosch HDH181

Bosch HDH181
The Bosch HDH181 hammer drill struck us as a wood-boring drill made to do occasion concrete drilling. Our conclusion is based on the fact that this drill did the fewest number of holes in our concrete endurance test, yet it did the second best in our wood drilling tests. We noted that when under extra strain, the handle assembly on the drill (not the secondary extension handle) seemed to flex a little too much. Also this drill is the second most expensive tool in the line-up.
Pros: Quick wood drilling.
Cons: Low concrete endurance, Unsettling tool handle flex, 1 year warranty.
Price: $329
Verdict: Decent wood drill with a bonus hammer function.

dewalt DCD985L2DeWalt DCD985L2
Of all the drills, the overall style and functionality of the DeWalt DCD985L2 stays true to its roots. Anyone that is familiar with earlier generations of this product will be quick to recognize that over the years not much has changed on the outside. With a large metal gear box, there is a certain level of conveyed toughness. I did like the three speed mechanical gear box. DeWalt seemed to take the “if its not broke, don’t fix it” path with this tool. This drill did the best in all our wood drilling tests and was mid pack for our concrete drilling. DeWalt just released new XR Series drills, however at present those are geared towards compactness and run-time (as opposed to raw torque), and so we didn’t include them in this series of tests.
Pros: Fastest wood drilling, Rock solid secondary handle, Three-speed gear box.
Cons: Rigid materials means extra felt vibration.
Price: $299
Verdict: Tough build quality that should deliver years of use.

hilti SFH 18-AHilti SFH 18-A
The single best word to describe the Hilti SFH 18-A is “refined”. With the overall fastest RPM and BPM, this drill literally melts the concrete out of its way. Much like an Italian sports car, the SFH 18-A has a unique sound all its own, and like an Italian sports car, it also has a premium price tag. Those who are familiar with Hilti products will be quick to latch onto this tool knowing that they are getting some serious performance wrapped up into a sleek package that is a joy to use.
Pros: Hi-speed, Low vibration, Second fastest concrete drilling speed, Lifetime warranty.
Cons: Expensive, No LED work light.
Price: $399
Verdict: The sports car of hammer drills that will make your buddies jealous.

hitachi DV18DBLHitachi DV18DBL
On paper the Hitachi DV18DBL looked promising. With a brushless motor and a four-level electronic speed control (besides the two speed switchable gear box), we thought that we would be in for a treat. Seeing how brushless motors seem to be the rage in some product categories, we were eager to see how this one did. I hate to say it, but we were disappointed. This drill not only did the fewest number of holes, but it was also the slowest in drilling concrete and had the most felt vibration. Perhaps for some users that demand extremely critical speed control, the presence of eight speed and torque settings will be enough. Hitachi also offers a limited lifetime warranty for their cordless lithium-ion tools.
Pros: Eight speed & torque options, Limited lifetime warranty, Belt clip.
Cons: Slow concrete drilling with too much felt vibration.
Price: $279
Verdict: User comfort, speed and torque need to be higher on the priority list next time around.

makita LXPH03Makita LXPH03
Makita had the highest measured torque of all the tools tested. That translated into competitive performance in our wood boring tests (though not the top spots) and netted the tool a tight third place in our concrete drilling speed tests. The Makita feels quick when drilling into concrete and felt vibration is pretty low. One ongoing pet peeve is that Makita still has no battery level meter on their packs or the tool, so you never know how much charge is left when you pick up the drill.
Pros: Belt clip, Highest measured torque, Low felt vibration.
Cons: No battery level gauge.
Price: $289
Verdict: A solid performer with a lot of competition.

milwaukee 2604-20Milwaukee 2604-22
The engineers at Milwaukee have been doing their homework on what tool users like. With probably the best combination of size, performance and features, the 2604-22 is a great workhorse tool that keeps asking for more. The only thing that we did not like is that the detachable side handle is only able to be installed in two pre-set positions, leaving the user wanting more options to maximize comfort. Their 5-year warranty is also something that inspires confidence in your tool purchase.
Pros: Fastest in concrete with most holes drilled, 4.0 amp-hour battery, 5-year warranty.
Cons: Limited handle positioning.
Price: $299
Verdict: Concrete drilling monster.

ridgid R8611501Ridgid R8611501K
At my shop, Ridgid has become known for their workhorse dependability and features. They are not sexy or sleek tools, but they work. In today’s economy, price sometimes becomes a bigger factor than features for contractors. I am continually impressed with the quality and features that Ridgid incorporates into their tools for a a reasonable price. The R8611501K hammer drill is no exception. With what can be considered the best results for all the 3.0 amp-hour equipped tools in our concrete drilling, the Ridgid is a good choice and a solid performer.
Pros: Highest number of holes with a 3.0 amp-hour battery.
Cons: Middle of the pack torque numbers.
Price: $279
Verdict: Faithful and dependable workhorse.

 

Concrete bits and testing materials for this review were provided by Lowe’s Home Improvement Warehouse.

Related Post


Quick tip

Paint effects

Try out different paint effects to give your home a new look, try rag rolling, stippling or marbling. If you’re handy with a paint brush and eager to let your inner artist out, then consider painting a trompe l’oeil effect on a wall. Remember you could simply project an image onto a wall and paint around it – you don’t need to be a great artist to have a go at this. So get your paint brushes out and get creative.


 

Give is your thoughts by email ….

or join our Forum and discuss your tips or experiences Visit the forum


Off-peak

“If you elect to have off-peak (heures creuses) electricity, then EDF will provide you with wiring controlled by their equipment to switch your off-peak system on and off. The EDF off-peak equipment is usually a relay located beside their meter and fusegear. This relay is meant for the control circuit functions of your contactor (contacteur) or off-peak relay (jour/nuit) only. It must not be used to directly control equipment. The EDF relay is timed to operate in the usual manner at the predetermined off-peak times”

Excerpt From: Thomas Malcolm. “Electricity in your French house.” iBooks. https://itunes.apple.com/gb/book/electricity-in-your-french-house/id413215097?mt=11


 

We are a new website, we are still growing our content, we want everyone that is renovating in France to help us feature what we all wanted to know when we all started, contact us with all your experience and tips, we live just south of Celles Sur Belle, in Deux Servre, 79, and are just about to start out on our next renovation, every job we start on, every problem, product or skill we need to learn about i will try and find some useful information on the internet and share it with you, yes I could do this by sharing it on facebook, but the problem is it just helps facebook and disappears down the timeline, here links and articles will be searchable and here permanently for you to book mark and refer to, so watch this space … and if you have links and articles that have helped you let us know !!1

For those looking to improve, and not move, extending your property as part of an internal (and often external) remodel can offer the additional space you need and create a more attractive home.

If you’re hoping to introduce a contemporary addition to the rear or side of your home, these examples listed below are sure to offer plenty of design ideas and inspiration to get you started.


Quick tip

Paint effects

Try out different paint effects to give your home a new look, try rag rolling, stippling or marbling. If you’re handy with a paint brush and eager to let your inner artist out, then consider painting a trompe l’oeil effect on a wall. Remember you could simply project an image onto a wall and paint around it – you don’t need to be a great artist to have a go at this. So get your paint brushes out and get creative.


 

Arts & Crafts meets futuristic fantasy with this modern addition and its wing-like roof from Stan Bolt Architect.


Off-peak

“If you elect to have off-peak (heures creuses) electricity, then EDF will provide you with wiring controlled by their equipment to switch your off-peak system on and off. The EDF off-peak equipment is usually a relay located beside their meter and fusegear. This relay is meant for the control circuit functions of your contactor (contacteur) or off-peak relay (jour/nuit) only. It must not be used to directly control equipment. The EDF relay is timed to operate in the usual manner at the predetermined off-peak times”

Excerpt From: Thomas Malcolm. “Electricity in your French house.” iBooks. https://itunes.apple.com/gb/book/electricity-in-your-french-house/id413215097?mt=11


 

Frameless glazing sits alongside period brickwork in this stunning project designed by Hampshire-based practice AR Design Studio.

Two modern ground floor box-out extensions, designed by architect and homeowner Nils Feldmann, have increased the living space in this Victorian home, and contrast against the existing brickwork.

A modest rear extension to this 1930s semi-detached home offers the extra space the growing family needed, while keeping within a tight budget.

A dynamic new cantilevered extension connects with this original stone barn, forming an angular and quirky stepped layout inside and providing a spectacular master bedroom space.

A flat roof rear extension designed by AR Design Studio houses a large kitchen diner and opens up the ground floor of this Hampshire home. A second two-storey side extension, clad in the same London stock brick as the existing property, houses a utility at ground level and a new master suite above.

A collection of contemporary extensions designed by Paper Igloo, clad in timber and Cor-ten steel and connected by glazed links, has been added to an old farmhouse.

A far cry from the existing dated red-brick bungalow, the homeowners here added a single-storey extension and internal and external remodel to create a California-style home.

Thanks to the vision of Ellis Williams Architects, a convex two-storey extension with glass façade wraps around this listed water tower.

From bungalow to brilliant — this timber frame first floor addition with contrasting cladding boasts wow-factor.

Designed by Beam Cottage Architect, a new glazed link offers a transition between this period cottage and its modern rear, complete with a dramatic timber first floor box.

A dramatic first floor extension, complete with covered balcony has turned this bungalow into a chalet-style home that wouldn’t look out of place in a luxury ski resort.

This impressive modern extension completed by Matt Maisuria Architects almost doubles the size of the existing home.

A stylish basement extension designed by Riach Architects offers open plan family space to a Victorian terrace in Oxford.

This double-height Cor-ten steel-clad wedge by Andrew McAvoy of Retool Architecture offers striking contrast to a granite steading.

A post-war property has been expanded thanks to a unique timber-clad corridor of bedrooms designed by Dan Brill Architects.

A boring bungalow becomes a Modernist masterpiece thanks to a two storey additio by Matt Maisuria Architects.

A larch and stainless steel wing by Room Architects offers a dynamic contrast to this period farmhouse — and proof of just how these older agricultural buildings can be transformed.

This glazed box designed by Belsize Architects proves that extensions do not have to be huge to make a visual impact.

Shards of glass lend to the futuristic feel of this flat-roof addition to a Victorian home, designed by Coffey Architects.

A new timber frame box linked via glazed panels from PAD Studio renders this 1970s home unrecognisable.

Adding interest, this multistorey timber tower rear designed by 51% Studios sits above a new light-filled base, offering increased accommodation.

A series of jagged boxes set off from one another – one grey rendered, one timber clad – offers a splash of modern style, designed by AR Design Studio.

This functional, frameless glazed link by Emrys Architects connects three buildings to form one home.

See the original article here https://www.homebuilding.co.uk/modern-extensions-design-gallery/


DIY Tips

Want to add a personal touch to your home? Then get creative to add style that’s one of a kind to your home. Patchwork, knitting and crochet can all be used to add chic soft furnishings and accessories to your home, from cushions to throws and more. If you are new to crafting there’s lots of advice available online including helpful craft tutorials. Also take a make do and mend approach to upcycling existing pieces in your home with paint, decoupage or fabric.


 

Give is your thoughts by email ….

or join our Forum and discuss your tips or experiences Visit the forum


Off-peak

“If you elect to have off-peak (heures creuses) electricity, then EDF will provide you with wiring controlled by their equipment to switch your off-peak system on and off. The EDF off-peak equipment is usually a relay located beside their meter and fusegear. This relay is meant for the control circuit functions of your contactor (contacteur) or off-peak relay (jour/nuit) only. It must not be used to directly control equipment. The EDF relay is timed to operate in the usual manner at the predetermined off-peak times”

Excerpt From: Thomas Malcolm. “Electricity in your French house.” iBooks. https://itunes.apple.com/gb/book/electricity-in-your-french-house/id413215097?mt=11


 

We are a new website, we are still growing our content, we want everyone that is renovating in France to help us feature what we all wanted to know when we all started, contact us with all your experience and tips, we live just south of Celles Sur Belle, in Deux Servre, 79, and are just about to start out on our next renovation, every job we start on, every problem, product or skill we need to learn about i will try and find some useful information on the internet and share it with you, yes I could do this by sharing it on facebook, but the problem is it just helps facebook and disappears down the timeline, here links and articles will be searchable and here permanently for you to book mark and refer to, so watch this space … and if you have links and articles that have helped you let us know !!1

You want the mortar used for your masonry project to be workable and strong.

Mortar is what is used to hold together brick, stone, and concrete masonry, making it a very important material. You want to make sure that the best quality of mortar is being used because you want your building to last as long as possible without needing any repairs. There are a few important properties of mortar that you should consider when deciding which type to use for your masonry project. Here are three important properties of mortar.

Workability

This is probably the most important property of mortar because you have to be able to manipulate it the way you want for it to work. When looking for work-ability, you want to look for one that spreads easily with the trowel and supports the weight of the masonry units. You want it to stick easily to the surfaces of the masonry and it should protrude from the joint when pressure is applied. If the mortar is workable, it will make for a much easier masonry project.


DIY Tips

Want to add a personal touch to your home? Then get creative to add style that’s one of a kind to your home. Patchwork, knitting and crochet can all be used to add chic soft furnishings and accessories to your home, from cushions to throws and more. If you are new to crafting there’s lots of advice available online including helpful craft tutorials. Also take a make do and mend approach to upcycling existing pieces in your home with paint, decoupage or fabric.


 

Bond

This property comes into play after the mortar has hardened. If it doesn’t bond well, your masonry units could being to separate from one another. The two components that measure bond are the extent-of-bond and bond strength. The extent-of-bond is the measure of the contact area of the mortar and masonry unit. The bond strength measures the stress required to break the bond.


Off-peak

“If you elect to have off-peak (heures creuses) electricity, then EDF will provide you with wiring controlled by their equipment to switch your off-peak system on and off. The EDF off-peak equipment is usually a relay located beside their meter and fusegear. This relay is meant for the control circuit functions of your contactor (contacteur) or off-peak relay (jour/nuit) only. It must not be used to directly control equipment. The EDF relay is timed to operate in the usual manner at the predetermined off-peak times”

Excerpt From: Thomas Malcolm. “Electricity in your French house.” iBooks. https://itunes.apple.com/gb/book/electricity-in-your-french-house/id413215097?mt=11


 

Stiffening Rate

The rate at which the mortar stiffens and dries is also important. Stiffening is caused by loss of moisture. The rate of stiffening should be high initially so that the construction process moves at a reasonable pace. If the stiffening rate is too low, the mortar will squeeze out as time goes on, resulting in varied thickness and distortion of the masonry. If it’s too quick, however, the masonry could crack. Things like climate and the material that you are using impact how fast or slow the stiffening rate should be.

Your Preferred Masonry Contractor Is Del Prete Masonry

If you are ready to upgrade your home or commercial building with professional masonry installation or replacement, Del Prete Masonry has the experience and expertise to get the job done right for the right price. To explore our residential and commercial services and set up a consultation, please give us a call at 410-683-0650 or contact us online. We currently serve Baltimore City and County, Harford County, Carroll County, Anne Arundel County, and Howard County. To see examples of our work and get more updates, follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, and Pinterest.

 

The post 3 Important Properties Of Mortar appeared first on Del Prete Masonry, Inc.

original article is here http://www.delpretemasonry.com/mortar/3-important-properties-mortar/


Quick tip

Paint effects

Try out different paint effects to give your home a new look, try rag rolling, stippling or marbling. If you’re handy with a paint brush and eager to let your inner artist out, then consider painting a trompe l’oeil effect on a wall. Remember you could simply project an image onto a wall and paint around it – you don’t need to be a great artist to have a go at this. So get your paint brushes out and get creative.


 

Give is your thoughts by email ….

or join our Forum and discuss your tips or experiences Visit the forum


Electrical Tip

“Although at first glance lighting, sockets and off-peak heating in France may all appear familiar, closer investigation will reveal that the installation methods are different to those employed in the UK”

Excerpt From: Thomas Malcolm. “Electricity in your French house.” iBooks. https://itunes.apple.com/gb/book/electricity-in-your-french-house/id413215097?mt=11


 

We are a new website, we are still growing our content, we want everyone that is renovating in France to help us feature what we all wanted to know when we all started, contact us with all your experience and tips, we live just south of Celles Sur Belle, in Deux Servre, 79, and are just about to start out on our next renovation, every job we start on, every problem, product or skill we need to learn about i will try and find some useful information on the internet and share it with you, yes I could do this by sharing it on facebook, but the problem is it just helps facebook and disappears down the timeline, here links and articles will be searchable and here permanently for you to book mark and refer to, so watch this space … and if you have links and articles that have helped you let us know !!1

There are a variety of different types of brick that you can use for your commercial building.

If you’re thinking of installing a brick wall on your commercial property, you probably have a particular purpose in mind. There are different types, or categories, of brick walls you can build, all with their own strengths. As with all projects, maintaining and repairing your wall and paying attention to cracks, loose bricks, or other types of brick deterioration is critical to the longevity of your project. However, ensuring that you have the correct type of wall for your needs will lessen the amount of work to maintain. Consider these three categories of brick walls you can build on your property: 

Solid Walls

A solid brick wall is two or more layers thick and is held together with metal ties or header bricks. If you choose header bricks, they are laid perpendicularly to the wall itself. For a truly durable, strong solid wall, consider the layers and overall wall thickness, the brick and mortar durability, and the strength of the mortar bond itself. Ensuring these pieces are all in good working order will give you a strong and long lasting brick wall.


DIY Tips

Want to add a personal touch to your home? Then get creative to add style that’s one of a kind to your home. Patchwork, knitting and crochet can all be used to add chic soft furnishings and accessories to your home, from cushions to throws and more. If you are new to crafting there’s lots of advice available online including helpful craft tutorials. Also take a make do and mend approach to upcycling existing pieces in your home with paint, decoupage or fabric.


 

Cavity Walls

A cavity brick wall uses more than brick and mortar to hold itself together, as there are two layers separated by a 2-4 inch space. The outer layer is always brick, but the inner “supporting” layer can be brick, concrete blocks, or poured concrete. If the climate around your building is often wet or damp, building a cavity brick wall behooves you as it prevents water from getting in and the air space itself acts like a water barrier.


Electrical Tip

“Although at first glance lighting, sockets and off-peak heating in France may all appear familiar, closer investigation will reveal that the installation methods are different to those employed in the UK”

Excerpt From: Thomas Malcolm. “Electricity in your French house.” iBooks. https://itunes.apple.com/gb/book/electricity-in-your-french-house/id413215097?mt=11


 

Veneer Walls

Veneer brick walls are typically one layer of brick tied to steel or wooden studs, like on the outside of a house. Since a single layer is not a very good insulator, insulation is typically added to the steel or wood studs, but not within the brick wall itself.

 

Your Preferred Masonry Professional Is Del Prete Masonry

If you are ready to upgrade your home or commercial building with professional masonry installation or replacement, Del Prete Masonry has the experience and expertise to get the job done right for the right price. To explore our residential and commercial services and set up a consultation, please give us a call at 410-683-0650 or contact us online. We currently serve Baltimore City and County, Harford County, Carroll County, Anne Arundel County, and Howard County. To see examples of our work and get more updates, follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, and Pinterest.

 

The post 3 Types of Brick Walls Available for Your Commercial Property appeared first on Del Prete Masonry, Inc.

original article is here http://www.delpretemasonry.com/blog/brick-blog/3-types-brick-walls-available-commercial-property/


Quick tip

Paint effects

Try out different paint effects to give your home a new look, try rag rolling, stippling or marbling. If you’re handy with a paint brush and eager to let your inner artist out, then consider painting a trompe l’oeil effect on a wall. Remember you could simply project an image onto a wall and paint around it – you don’t need to be a great artist to have a go at this. So get your paint brushes out and get creative.


 

Give is your thoughts by email ….

or join our Forum and discuss your tips or experiences Visit the forum


Off-peak

“If you elect to have off-peak (heures creuses) electricity, then EDF will provide you with wiring controlled by their equipment to switch your off-peak system on and off. The EDF off-peak equipment is usually a relay located beside their meter and fusegear. This relay is meant for the control circuit functions of your contactor (contacteur) or off-peak relay (jour/nuit) only. It must not be used to directly control equipment. The EDF relay is timed to operate in the usual manner at the predetermined off-peak times”

Excerpt From: Thomas Malcolm. “Electricity in your French house.” iBooks. https://itunes.apple.com/gb/book/electricity-in-your-french-house/id413215097?mt=11


 

We are a new website, we are still growing our content, we want everyone that is renovating in France to help us feature what we all wanted to know when we all started, contact us with all your experience and tips, we live just south of Celles Sur Belle, in Deux Servre, 79, and are just about to start out on our next renovation, every job we start on, every problem, product or skill we need to learn about i will try and find some useful information on the internet and share it with you, yes I could do this by sharing it on facebook, but the problem is it just helps facebook and disappears down the timeline, here links and articles will be searchable and here permanently for you to book mark and refer to, so watch this space … and if you have links and articles that have helped you let us know !!1

In order to design a lifetime home with accessibility in mind – whether this be with an eye to the future, or to cater to the needs of a family member – there are plenty of design considerations to factor in — from the number of storeys (and do you need a lift), to the width of corridors and door openings, level thresholds, bathrooms, and even the height of your kitchen units and windows.

Here, we list some inspiring accessible homes that prove you don’t have to sacrifice good design in the process.


Quick tip

Paint effects

Try out different paint effects to give your home a new look, try rag rolling, stippling or marbling. If you’re handy with a paint brush and eager to let your inner artist out, then consider painting a trompe l’oeil effect on a wall. Remember you could simply project an image onto a wall and paint around it – you don’t need to be a great artist to have a go at this. So get your paint brushes out and get creative.


 

Thanks to their son, architect Olly Bray of award-winning practice OB Architecture, Mike and Linda Bray have created a bespoke, futureproof home which caters to Mike who lives with multiple sclerosis.


Off-peak

“If you elect to have off-peak (heures creuses) electricity, then EDF will provide you with wiring controlled by their equipment to switch your off-peak system on and off. The EDF off-peak equipment is usually a relay located beside their meter and fusegear. This relay is meant for the control circuit functions of your contactor (contacteur) or off-peak relay (jour/nuit) only. It must not be used to directly control equipment. The EDF relay is timed to operate in the usual manner at the predetermined off-peak times”

Excerpt From: Thomas Malcolm. “Electricity in your French house.” iBooks. https://itunes.apple.com/gb/book/electricity-in-your-french-house/id413215097?mt=11


 

The house has been designed so that the bedrooms are positioned on the ground floor, with a lift up to the open plan kitchen/dining/living space and balcony on the first floor — ensuring that Mike is able to access every room with ease. Sliding glass doors open directly to the terrace on the ground floor, with no steps or changes in floor level.

In order to cater for their daughter who has Angelman Syndrome, Neil and Fiona Blakeley have self built their new home with an internal therapy room, swimming pool and sensory room at ground level. A guest bedroom suite on the ground floor further helps to futureproof the house.

With a view to creating a low-maintenance home fit for their retirement, Charles and Pennie Denton commissioned Strom Architects to design a stylish single-storey property which sits perfectly on its site.

Ultra-wide corridors and open plan living, complete with level thresholds leading out to the garden through large glazed doors, allow the home to be accessibility friendly, which meets the needs of their daughter who uses a wheelchair and regularly comes to visit.

“We needed absolutely everything to have level access and wanted the house to be as spacious and light as possible with no narrow corridors,” explains Lara Lessman, who is a wheelchair user. Along with husband Dieter, the couple have created a contemporary home carved from a building plot at the back of their former garden.

In order to allow Lara to go about her day-to-day life with ease, level thresholds between rooms and to the garden have been introduced, and with kitchen worktops at a level that can be reached from a seating position. A compact wheelchair lift was introduced to carry Lara to the lower level which houses the physiotherapy room.

Replacing a bungalow on the site, the motivation behind the design of this striking contemporary home was ensuring the owners’ eldest son – who has cerebral palsy and relies on a wheelchair to get about much of the time – can be as independent as possible.

The accessible home benefits from large, open plan spaces, wide corridors, carer’s accommodation and fully accessible bathroom with tracks recessed into the bathroom ceiling for hoists.

See the original article here https://www.homebuilding.co.uk/5-great-accessible-homes/


Quick tip

Paint effects

Try out different paint effects to give your home a new look, try rag rolling, stippling or marbling. If you’re handy with a paint brush and eager to let your inner artist out, then consider painting a trompe l’oeil effect on a wall. Remember you could simply project an image onto a wall and paint around it – you don’t need to be a great artist to have a go at this. So get your paint brushes out and get creative.


 

Give is your thoughts by email ….

or join our Forum and discuss your tips or experiences Visit the forum


Off-peak

“If you elect to have off-peak (heures creuses) electricity, then EDF will provide you with wiring controlled by their equipment to switch your off-peak system on and off. The EDF off-peak equipment is usually a relay located beside their meter and fusegear. This relay is meant for the control circuit functions of your contactor (contacteur) or off-peak relay (jour/nuit) only. It must not be used to directly control equipment. The EDF relay is timed to operate in the usual manner at the predetermined off-peak times”

Excerpt From: Thomas Malcolm. “Electricity in your French house.” iBooks. https://itunes.apple.com/gb/book/electricity-in-your-french-house/id413215097?mt=11


 

We are a new website, we are still growing our content, we want everyone that is renovating in France to help us feature what we all wanted to know when we all started, contact us with all your experience and tips, we live just south of Celles Sur Belle, in Deux Servre, 79, and are just about to start out on our next renovation, every job we start on, every problem, product or skill we need to learn about i will try and find some useful information on the internet and share it with you, yes I could do this by sharing it on facebook, but the problem is it just helps facebook and disappears down the timeline, here links and articles will be searchable and here permanently for you to book mark and refer to, so watch this space … and if you have links and articles that have helped you let us know !!1

On most homes, the roof is the key external feature and with the wealth of options available when it comes to design, structure and coverings there are endless possible outcomes.

Whether you are building your own home from scratch, renovating an older home or extending, there are a number of criteria that will affect how satisfying your new roof will look.


DIY Tips

Want to add a personal touch to your home? Then get creative to add style that’s one of a kind to your home. Patchwork, knitting and crochet can all be used to add chic soft furnishings and accessories to your home, from cushions to throws and more. If you are new to crafting there’s lots of advice available online including helpful craft tutorials. Also take a make do and mend approach to upcycling existing pieces in your home with paint, decoupage or fabric.


 

Here are five important things that you should know about roofs.


Electrical Tip

“Although at first glance lighting, sockets and off-peak heating in France may all appear familiar, closer investigation will reveal that the installation methods are different to those employed in the UK”

Excerpt From: Thomas Malcolm. “Electricity in your French house.” iBooks. https://itunes.apple.com/gb/book/electricity-in-your-french-house/id413215097?mt=11


 

1. Pitch Can Make or Break a Design

Characteristically, Arts and Crafts homes like this have steeply pitched roofs (normally between 48° and 51°)

As well as offering a satisfying aesthetic, there are practical reasons why you need to ensure that your project has the right pitch. Choose wrong and your project will look odd and leave you dissatisfied.

For example, if you are building a cottage-style home with a thatched roof, you’ll need a steep pitch of at least 45°(50°is better still). This pitch is not only a staple of cottage style, thus creating a visually satisfying structure, but will also allow rain to flow off the roof quickly and prevent ingress.

When it comes to gaining planning permission, designers can often be asked to reduce the pitch if it is deemed to have too much impact on any adjacent buildings, so be prepared to be flexible — your architect or designer will ensure that the end result is still visually satisfying.

A 39° pitch is good for a Georgian-style home,
while a steeper pitch is perfect for an Arts and Crafts house

2. You Can Factor Insulation into the Design

Effective insulation is key to the efficiency of our homes (and lower heating bills). If you are not planning on using the loft space in an existing home, then you can simply roll out insulation above the loft floor. But if you are planning on converting the loft into living space, then you’ll need to insulate directly under the sloping roof.

If you’re building a new home, a cost-effective and simple solution is to construct a warm roof, where the insulation sits directly above the rafters with a roofing membrane laid over the top.

If your new roof has a simple design, then you could also consider using insulated panels laid across a series of beams instead of rafters.

3. Want to Convert the Loft? Plan Ahead

Choose the wrong structure and it could prove more complex and costly to convert the roof area into useful living space down the line. 

In prefabricated trussed roof structures, a fink truss (where the roof members form a ‘W’ shape) roof will be harder to turn into usable space compared to an attic truss roof, so it’s worth deciding early on if you want to be able to use the space down the line. A more expensive roofing structure now, could mean cheaper conversion later.

4. There’s a Plethora of Structural Choices

Green roofs, like on this eco-friendly self build, are a great option for those wanting to offset their carbon footprint as the plants absorb CO2

While some methods are quicker and easier (and less expensive) than others, there are more ways than ever to build a roof structure. At the typically less expensive end of the scale, you have your prefabricated trussed roof options, with fink trusses often offering the cheapest solution, while at the more expensive end, you have your cut roof and panellised options such as SIPs.

Curved or panellised roofs work best with simple shapes and it’s worth remembering that the more complex the design, the longer it will take on site and the higher the end cost will be.

5. Flat Roofs Aren’t Actually Flat

The flat, low lying roof on this self build in Skye helps the home blend into the landscape

Flat roofs are a popular choice for those wanting to build contemporary-style homes (or embrace the Modernist aesthetic). But despite the moniker, they aren’t actually flat. In order to prevent rainwater pooling and causing damage, flat roofs are built at a low pitch, known as a fall, to facilitate effective drainage. 

The fall should be around 1:40 (never less than 1:80) in order to work effectively.

Check out how Charlie Luxton prepared the flat roof structure on his self build project.

See the original article here https://www.homebuilding.co.uk/things-you-should-know-about-roofs/


DIY Tips

Want to add a personal touch to your home? Then get creative to add style that’s one of a kind to your home. Patchwork, knitting and crochet can all be used to add chic soft furnishings and accessories to your home, from cushions to throws and more. If you are new to crafting there’s lots of advice available online including helpful craft tutorials. Also take a make do and mend approach to upcycling existing pieces in your home with paint, decoupage or fabric.


 

Give is your thoughts by email ….

or join our Forum and discuss your tips or experiences Visit the forum


Electrical Tip

“Although at first glance lighting, sockets and off-peak heating in France may all appear familiar, closer investigation will reveal that the installation methods are different to those employed in the UK”

Excerpt From: Thomas Malcolm. “Electricity in your French house.” iBooks. https://itunes.apple.com/gb/book/electricity-in-your-french-house/id413215097?mt=11


 

We are a new website, we are still growing our content, we want everyone that is renovating in France to help us feature what we all wanted to know when we all started, contact us with all your experience and tips, we live just south of Celles Sur Belle, in Deux Servre, 79, and are just about to start out on our next renovation, every job we start on, every problem, product or skill we need to learn about i will try and find some useful information on the internet and share it with you, yes I could do this by sharing it on facebook, but the problem is it just helps facebook and disappears down the timeline, here links and articles will be searchable and here permanently for you to book mark and refer to, so watch this space … and if you have links and articles that have helped you let us know !!1

From barns to warehouses, churches to schoolhouses, garages, and many more besides, the list of potential conversion opportunities are endless. While not for the fainthearted, carrying out a conversion of a commercial or agricultural building can have its perks — not least the charm and character that these buildings can offer.

Churches might boast original stained glass windows and voluminous ceiling heights, while barns might benefit from large openings ideal for introducing swathes of glazing. Despite the price tag often associated with many of these projects, we have highlighted some fantastic budget conversion projects which are proof that reviving these older buildings needn’t break the bank.


Quick tip

Paint effects

Try out different paint effects to give your home a new look, try rag rolling, stippling or marbling. If you’re handy with a paint brush and eager to let your inner artist out, then consider painting a trompe l’oeil effect on a wall. Remember you could simply project an image onto a wall and paint around it – you don’t need to be a great artist to have a go at this. So get your paint brushes out and get creative.


 

1. A Public Loo Converted for £65,000

A fine example of converting unusual commercial buildings, this public loo in Cornwall has been converted into a beautiful holiday home for just £65,000. Overlooking the bay, and boasting fantastic sea views, the 200-year-old building was completely stripped out and a new first floor installed in order to make way for open plan living accommodation on the ground floor, with two bedrooms above.


Electrical Tip

“Although at first glance lighting, sockets and off-peak heating in France may all appear familiar, closer investigation will reveal that the installation methods are different to those employed in the UK”

Excerpt From: Thomas Malcolm. “Electricity in your French house.” iBooks. https://itunes.apple.com/gb/book/electricity-in-your-french-house/id413215097?mt=11


 

This former coach house in Harrogate has undergone a significant transformation – including an extension and raised roof – to create a characterful family home. Modern influences have been introduced, from the contemporary high-gloss kitchen to the hotel-style master bedroom, and structural glass floor on the upstairs landing — all for under £150,000.

With the interiors clad in asbestos panels, making this Victorian corrugated tin chapel in Chester habitable was a major undertaking. Thanks to carefully reworking the interiors while retaining the original details of the existing building, including the double-height voluminous spaces, the homeowners have gone on to create a beautiful home for under £84,000.

Converting your garage space can be an ideal means of increasing your living accommodation without having to add an extension.

To create an open plan kitchen diner, this garage conversion to a family home involved removing a rear wall that backed on to the existing kitchen to open the spaces for an open plan area. The brief also included an area for the children to watch television and use the games console, but not be in a separate room.

The conversion, not including the supply and fit of the kitchen, cost approximately £10,500.

In order to convert this former church from a draughty shell into a comfortable home on a budget of £146,000, the homeowners had to carry out the bulk of the work on a DIY basis.

Elements such as the stained glass window in the double-height living space has been left well alone to add character, while additions such as a new first floor to house a master suite, and new walls at ground level to create a guest room and study, allow modern and traditional elements to sit together naturally.

The homeowners of this Grade II-listed cider barn saw the potential to convert the building from being a rundown shell with no window openings, no electricity or plumbing, and damaged wattle and daub walls, to becoming a charming three bedroom home, complete with a cosy fireplace in the snug – the stone from which was found in the adjacent garden – all for just £75,000.

See the original article here https://www.homebuilding.co.uk/budget-conversion-projects/


DIY Tips

Want to add a personal touch to your home? Then get creative to add style that’s one of a kind to your home. Patchwork, knitting and crochet can all be used to add chic soft furnishings and accessories to your home, from cushions to throws and more. If you are new to crafting there’s lots of advice available online including helpful craft tutorials. Also take a make do and mend approach to upcycling existing pieces in your home with paint, decoupage or fabric.


 

Give is your thoughts by email ….

or join our Forum and discuss your tips or experiences Visit the forum


Electrical Tip

“Although at first glance lighting, sockets and off-peak heating in France may all appear familiar, closer investigation will reveal that the installation methods are different to those employed in the UK”

Excerpt From: Thomas Malcolm. “Electricity in your French house.” iBooks. https://itunes.apple.com/gb/book/electricity-in-your-french-house/id413215097?mt=11


 

We are a new website, we are still growing our content, we want everyone that is renovating in France to help us feature what we all wanted to know when we all started, contact us with all your experience and tips, we live just south of Celles Sur Belle, in Deux Servre, 79, and are just about to start out on our next renovation, every job we start on, every problem, product or skill we need to learn about i will try and find some useful information on the internet and share it with you, yes I could do this by sharing it on facebook, but the problem is it just helps facebook and disappears down the timeline, here links and articles will be searchable and here permanently for you to book mark and refer to, so watch this space … and if you have links and articles that have helped you let us know !!1

Structural insulated panels, commonly known as SIPs, are made by sandwiching insulation between two sheets of oriented strand board (OSB).

The panels are strong (often requiring little further support), and offer good U-values and excellent airtightness.


DIY Tips

Want to add a personal touch to your home? Then get creative to add style that’s one of a kind to your home. Patchwork, knitting and crochet can all be used to add chic soft furnishings and accessories to your home, from cushions to throws and more. If you are new to crafting there’s lots of advice available online including helpful craft tutorials. Also take a make do and mend approach to upcycling existing pieces in your home with paint, decoupage or fabric.


 

These seven homes all feature SIPs in their construction.


Off-peak

“If you elect to have off-peak (heures creuses) electricity, then EDF will provide you with wiring controlled by their equipment to switch your off-peak system on and off. The EDF off-peak equipment is usually a relay located beside their meter and fusegear. This relay is meant for the control circuit functions of your contactor (contacteur) or off-peak relay (jour/nuit) only. It must not be used to directly control equipment. The EDF relay is timed to operate in the usual manner at the predetermined off-peak times”

Excerpt From: Thomas Malcolm. “Electricity in your French house.” iBooks. https://itunes.apple.com/gb/book/electricity-in-your-french-house/id413215097?mt=11


 

  • Location: Stirling, Scotland
  • Build cost: £474,000 (£1,185/m²)

Homeowner Colin Amor chose to build his barn-style home using SIPs to make his home as airtight and energy-efficient as possible.

Useful Information

  • Location: Suffolk
  • Build cost: £301,000 (£1,881/m²)

After struggling to find a suitable home when wanting to downsize, Sue Crowe opted for self build. Her contemporary oak frame home features structural insulated panels which were erected quickly and offered remarkable U-values at a reasonable cost.

  • Location: Cambridgeshire
  • Build cost: £200,000 (£909/m²)

Rebecca and Matthew Stenson’s oak frame self build has been clad using SIPs and finished externally with a traditional lime render, proving that an understated cottage style can be achieved on a modest budget.

  • Location: Manchester
  • Build cost: Undisclosed

Isobel Heyworth’s self-designed new home has been constructed using SIPs and is considered a benchmark for new houses in her Manchester suburb.

  • Location: Cornwall
  • Build cost: £360,000 (£1,333/m²)

Beccy and Steve Kestin have built an energy-efficient home, choosing structural insulated panels for their fast construction time and airtightness. Despite its extensive use of glazing, the property is superbly insulated thanks to the SIPs.

  • Location: Cambridgeshire
  • Build cost: £941,000 (£2,476/m²)

First-time self builders Caroline and Julian Owen encased the walls of their oak frame self build in SIPs to satisfy their desire for an energy-efficient home.

  • Location: Lewes, East Sussex
  • Build cost: £850,000

Stephen Yeomans has incorporate SIPs into his head-turner of a self build. The panels were used for the roof and first floor walls, which were then wrapped in an expanded corten steel mesh.

Useful Information

See the original article here https://www.homebuilding.co.uk/7-self-builds-featuring-sips/


DIY Tips

Want to add a personal touch to your home? Then get creative to add style that’s one of a kind to your home. Patchwork, knitting and crochet can all be used to add chic soft furnishings and accessories to your home, from cushions to throws and more. If you are new to crafting there’s lots of advice available online including helpful craft tutorials. Also take a make do and mend approach to upcycling existing pieces in your home with paint, decoupage or fabric.


 

Give is your thoughts by email ….

or join our Forum and discuss your tips or experiences Visit the forum


Electrical Tip

“Although at first glance lighting, sockets and off-peak heating in France may all appear familiar, closer investigation will reveal that the installation methods are different to those employed in the UK”

Excerpt From: Thomas Malcolm. “Electricity in your French house.” iBooks. https://itunes.apple.com/gb/book/electricity-in-your-french-house/id413215097?mt=11


 

We are a new website, we are still growing our content, we want everyone that is renovating in France to help us feature what we all wanted to know when we all started, contact us with all your experience and tips, we live just south of Celles Sur Belle, in Deux Servre, 79, and are just about to start out on our next renovation, every job we start on, every problem, product or skill we need to learn about i will try and find some useful information on the internet and share it with you, yes I could do this by sharing it on facebook, but the problem is it just helps facebook and disappears down the timeline, here links and articles will be searchable and here permanently for you to book mark and refer to, so watch this space … and if you have links and articles that have helped you let us know !!1

We are a new website, we are still growing our content, we want everyone that is renovating in France to help us feature what we all wanted to know when we all started, contact us with all your experience and tips, we live just south of Celles Sur Belle, in Deux Servre, 79, and are just about to start out on our next renovation, every job we start on, every problem, product or skill we need to learn about i will try and find some useful information on the internet and share it with you, yes I could do this by sharing it on facebook, but the problem is it just helps facebook and disappears down the timeline, here links and articles will be searchable and here permanently for you to book mark and refer to, so watch this space … and if you have links and articles that have helped you let us know !!1

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